State University of New York Institute of Technology
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Medical-Ethics Controversies Highlight Dilemmas Relating To Life, Death, & Profit

In 2012 Belgium legalized euthanasia for people over 18, and since then has seen a rise in the use of euthanasia. Lawmakers of Belgium are considering a bill which will legalize euthanasia for children. The proposal to offer this to children is being debated because it is unclear on whether a child has the mental capacity to make an informed decision to die.  

Is it right to allow a child to have the ability of using euthanasia? In my opinion, you are considered an adult at the age of 18 and therefore should not be able to make any "adult" decisions prior to this age.  

Another debate on the rise is that is unfair for drug companies to conduct a clinical trial of drug or procedure but not publish results.  It can be considered wrong because the clients are exposing themselves to the dangers of the experiment, however, are not recognizing the societal benefits that they were expecting to see after the experiment. In the drug companies’ defense, the reason behind not publishing results is because, if unsuccessful, could tarnish their name and create a lead to the competition.

Also mentioned in this article is the potential conflict of interest of physician owned companies who are buying implants, and essentially "double-dipping" based on the idea that they will receive profit from the sale of the implant (generally hip, knee, or spine) and again from the installment in surgery. An interview by CBS News with two spine surgeons said that they have seen patients harmed by unnecessary procedures prompted by the desire for the profit. This idea of putting people through unnecessary surgery for the sake of making more money is unethical. Doctors are trusted by the people to make their best decision in regards to our health and future safety based on their knowledge provided by them to receive their title. It is unethical to make a selfish decision in general, but more importantly when it involves the wellness of another person.

http://www.globalethics.org/newsline/2013/11/04/medical-ethics-39/


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