State University of New York Institute of Technology
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California ethics agency slaps fines on lobbyists and clients

In the Business Wire’s recent article on Chevron’s ethics complaint against Thomas DiNapoli, we learn the corrupt undertakings of the New York State Comptroller.  The owning of over $800 million in Chevron stock coupled with abusing his abuse of entrusted power by pressuring the aforementioned Chevron to settle a lawsuit, which directly benefited a large financial contributor to DiNapoli’s campaigns, is a clear breach of ethics.  The article goes on to acknowledge the public pressuring of Chevron to push for a quick settlement, quoting Chevron’s own vice president Hewitt pale as stating "Mr. DiNapoli's actions serve only his political patrons, not the citizens of the State of New York or the beneficiaries of the Common Retirement Fund. This type of quid pro quo behavior is an apparent breach of ethical and legal responsibilities that warrants investigation."  It is further revealed that Mr. DiNapoli’s predecessor; Alan Hervesi had left office amongst the allegations of misconduct. This included a future prison sentence stemming from a “pay for play” scandal that took place during Hervesi’s term as Comptroller.

 

 

 

This article is another blemish on the state of New York as well as its Public Officer’s.  It shows the willingness to ignore any moral or ethical responsibility in lieu of fiscal or political gain.  It tells the story of another individual entrusted with power falling into corruption and scandal, ignoring the entrustment of so many others for the gain of himself along with a select few.  In a clear violation of New York public officer’s law DiNapoli used his influence so freely.  It almost seems like a brash slap to the face of Chevron and it’s officials.  It saddens me that a story of political corruption has become the norm in a financially driven society. One where money can literally buy political influence.  I am unsure whether or not Chevron is to blame for the allegations of alleged environmental harm, regardless; this is up to the courts to decide not Mr. DiNaopli, who is sure to be facing some justice of his own shortly for what is truly a flat out case of fraud.

 

 

 

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/chevron-files-ethics-complaint-against-new-york-state-comptroller-thomas-dinapoli-2012-11-20

 


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